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#Update: Increase in #Human #Infections with #Avian #Influenza #H7N9 Viruses During the 5th #Epidemic — #China, Oct. ‘16–Aug. 7 ‘17 (@CDCgov, edited)

Title : #Update: Increase in #Human #Infections with #Avian #Influenza #H7N9 Viruses During the 5th #Epidemic — #China, Oct. ‘16–Aug. 7 ‘17....

28 Apr 2017

#Avian #Influenza [#H5N1, #H5N6, #H7N9]–Weekly #Update No. 582 - 28 April 2017 (@WHO WPRO, edited)

 

Title: #Avian #Influenza [#H5N1, #H5N6]–Weekly #Update No. 582 - 28 April 2017.

Subject: Avian Influenza, H5N1 & H5N6 subtype, human cases in Western Pacific Region of the WHO.

Source: World Health Organization (WHO), Office for the Western Pacific Region, full PDF file: (LINK).

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Avian Influenza - Weekly Update No. 582 - 28 April 2017

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Human infection with avian influenza A(H5) viruses

  • Human infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus 
    • Between 21 and 27 April 2017, no new cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus were reported to WHO in the Western Pacific Region. 
    • From January 2003 to 27 April 2017, a total of 238 cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus were reported from four countries within the Western Pacific Region (Table 1). 
    • The last case was reported on 14 January 2016.
    • Of these cases, 134 were fatal, resulting in a case fatality rate (CFR) of 56%.
    • From January 2003 to 27 April 2017, there were 856 cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H5N1) virus reported from 16 countries worldwide. 
    • Of these cases, 452 were fatal, resulting in a CFR of 52.8%.
  • Human infection with avian influenza A(H5N6) virus
    • Between 21 to 27 April 2017, no new cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H5N6) virus were reported to WHO in the Western Pacific Region. 
    • The last case was reported on 1 December 2016 (source: http://www.who.int/csr/don/07-december-2016-ah5n6-china/en/)
    • A total of 16 laboratory-confirmed cases of human infection with influenza A(H5N6) virus, including six deaths, have been reported to WHO from China since 2014.

 

Public health risk assessment for human infection with avian influenza A(H5) viruses

  • Whenever avian influenza viruses are circulating in poultry, sporadic infections and small clusters of human cases are possible in people exposed to infected poultry or contaminated environments; therefore sporadic human cases are not unexpected. 
  • With the rapid spread and magnitude of avian influenza outbreaks due to existing and new influenza A(H5) viruses in poultry in areas that have not experienced this disease in animals recently, there is a need for increased vigilance in the animal and public health sectors.
  • Community awareness of the potential dangers for human health is essential to prevent infection in humans.
  • Surveillance should be enhanced to detect human infections if they occur and to detect early changes in transmissibility and infectivity of the viruses. 
  • For more information on confirmed cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H5) virus reported to WHO, visit: http://www.who.int/influenza/human_animal_interface/en/ 

 

Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in China

  • Between 21 April and 27 April 2017, no additional cases of human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus were published in Disease Outbreak News.
    • The most recent notification of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in the Western Pacific Region that was published through Disease Outbreak News was notified to WHO on 14 April 2017.  (Source: http://www.who.int/csr/don/20-april-2017-ah7n9-china/en/)
    • As of 27 April, a total of 1393 laboratory-confirmed human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus have been reported to WHO and published in Disease Outbreak News since early 2013.
    • WHO is continuing to assess the epidemiological situation and will conduct further risk assessments with new information.
    • Overall, the public health risk from avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses has not changed
    • Further sporadic human cases of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection are expected in affected and possibly neighbouring areas. 
    • Should human cases from affected areas travel internationally, their infection may be detected in another country during or after arrival.
    • If this were to occur, community level spread is considered unlikely as the virus does not have the ability to transmit easily among humans.
    • To date, there has been no evidence of sustained human-to-human transmission of avian influenza A(H7N9) virus. 
    • Human infections with the A(H7N9) virus are unusual and need to be monitored closely in order to identify changes in the virus and/or its transmission behaviour to humans as it may have a serious public health impact. 
    • For more information on human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus reported to WHO: http://www.who.int/influenza/human_animal_interface/influenza_h7n9/en/
    • For more information on risk assessment for avian influenza A(H7N9) virus: http://www.who.int/influenza/human_animal_interface/influenza_h7n9/RiskAssessment_H7N9_23Feb20115.pdf

 

Animal infection with avian influenza virus

 

Latest information on human seasonal influenza

 

Other updates

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Keywords: WHO; Updates; Avian Influenza; H5N1; H5N6; H7N9; Human; Asian Region.

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