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#Update: Increase in #Human #Infections with #Avian #Influenza #H7N9 Viruses During the 5th #Epidemic — #China, Oct. ‘16–Aug. 7 ‘17 (@CDCgov, edited)

Title : #Update: Increase in #Human #Infections with #Avian #Influenza #H7N9 Viruses During the 5th #Epidemic — #China, Oct. ‘16–Aug. 7 ‘17....

9 Feb 2017

#Prevalence and #Clinical Attributes of #Congenital #Microcephaly — #NewYork, 2013–2015 (@CDCgov, MMWR, abstract)

 

Title: #Prevalence and #Clinical Attributes of #Congenital #Microcephaly — #NewYork, 2013–2015.

Subject: Microcephaly prevalence in the New York area.

Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MMWR Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, full page: (LINK). Abstract.

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Prevalence and Clinical Attributes of Congenital Microcephaly — New York, 2013–2015

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Weekly / February 10, 2017 / 66(5);125–129

Format: [ PDF [162 KB] ]

Krishika A. Graham, MD1*; Deborah J. Fox, MPH2*; Achala Talati, DO1; Cristian Pantea, MS2; Laura Brady2; Sondra L. Carter, MD3; Eric Friedenberg, MD3; Neil M. Vora, MD3,4; Marilyn L. Browne, PhD2; Christopher T. Lee, MD3,5

Corresponding authors: Deborah J. Fox, deb.fox@health.ny.gov, 518-402-7950; Krishika A. Graham, kgraham1@health.nyc.gov, 347-396-2939.

1Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program, Division of Epidemiology, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; 2Congenital Malformations Registry, New York State Department of Health; 3Division of Disease Control, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; 4Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, CDC; 5Epidemic Intelligence Service, CDC.

* These authors contributed equally to this report.

Suggested citation for this article: Graham KA, Fox DJ, Talati A, et al. Prevalence and Clinical Attributes of Congenital Microcephaly — New York, 2013–2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2017;66:125–129. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6605a1.

 

Summary

  • What is already known about this topic?
    • Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause severe congenital microcephaly. In New York, the baseline prevalence of severe congenital microcephaly (defined by CDC and the National Birth Defects Prevention Network as head circumference <3rd percentile for gestational age and sex) has not been known.
  • What is added by this report?
    • During 2013–2015, before documentation of widespread introduction of imported Zika virus infection in the continental United States, the prevalence of severe congenital microcephaly in New York was 4.2 per 10,000 live births. Requests to birth hospitals identified 93% of cases, and statewide administrative discharge data identified 90% of cases.
  • What are the implications for public health practice?
    • Administrative data can enhance microcephaly case finding for birth defects surveillance programs. Cases of congenital microcephaly must be clinically confirmed using anthropometric measurements to determine whether they meet the case definition for severe congenital microcephaly. A baseline prevalence estimate of severe congenital microcephaly can enable estimation of risk attributable to Zika virus infection.

 

Abstract

Congenital Zika virus infection can cause microcephaly and other severe fetal neurological anomalies (1). To inform microcephaly surveillance efforts and assess ascertainment sources, the New York State Department of Health and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene sought to determine the prevalence of microcephaly in New York during 2013–2015, before known importation of Zika virus infections. Suspected newborn microcephaly diagnoses were identified from 1) reports submitted by birth hospitals in response to a request and 2) queries of a hospital administrative discharge database for newborn microcephaly diagnoses. Anthropometric measurements, maternal demographics, and pregnancy characteristics were abstracted from newborn records from both sources. Diagnoses were classified using microcephaly case definitions developed by CDC and the National Birth Defects Prevention Network (NBDPN) (2). During 2013–2015, 284 newborns in New York met the case definition for severe congenital microcephaly (prevalence = 4.2 per 10,000 live births). Most newborns with severe congenital microcephaly were identified by both sources; 263 (93%) were identified through hospital requests and 256 (90%) were identified through administrative discharge data. The proportions of newborns with severe congenital microcephaly who were black (30%) or Hispanic (31%) were higher than the observed proportions of black (15%) or Hispanic (23%) infants among New York live births. Fifty-eight percent of newborns with severe congenital microcephaly were born to mothers with pregnancy complications or who had in utero or perinatal infections or teratogenic exposures, genetic disorders, or family histories of birth defects.

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Keywords: US CDC; USA; Updates; Abstracts; Microcephaly; New York.

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