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  Title : #Avian #Influenza #H7N9 in #China: Preventing the Next #SARS. Subject : Avian Influenza, H7N9 subtype (Asian Lineage), poultry e...

6 May 2017

#Zika Virus and related complications – #Journals #Archives, recent added articles (May 6 2017)

 

Title: #Zika Virus and related complications – #Journals #Archives, recent added articles.

Subject: Zika Virus Research, deep-web scanning of papers repositories, update.

Source: WorldWideWeb, edited.

Code: [  R  ]

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  1. Zika virus as a causative agent for primary microencephaly: the evidence so far [2015]
  2. Zika virus induces massive cytoplasmic vacuolization and paraptosis-like death in infected cells.
    • Europe PubMed Central
      • Monel B; Compton AA; Bruel T; Amraoui S; Burlaud-Gaillard J; Roy N; Guivel-Benhassine F; Porrot F; Génin P; Meertens L; Sinigaglia L; Jouvenet N; Weil R; Casartelli N; Demangel C; Simon-Lorière E; Moris A; Roingeard P; Amara A; Schwartz O.
      • 2017-05-01  The EMBO journal
      • DOI: 10.15252/embj.201695597  ISSN: 0261-4189  PMID: 28473450
        • The cytopathic effects of Zika virus (ZIKV) are poorly characterized. Innate immunity controls ZIKV infection and disease in most infected patients through mechanisms that remain to be understood. Here, we studied the morphological cellular changes induced by ZIKV and addressed the role of interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITM), a family of broad-spectrum antiviral factors, during viral replication. We report that ZIKV induces massive vacuolization followed by "implosive" cell death in human epithelial cells, primary skin fibroblasts and astrocytes, a phenomenon which is exacerbated when IFITM3 levels are low. It is reminiscent of paraptosis, a caspase-independent, non-apoptotic form of cell death associated with the formation of large cytoplasmic vacuoles. We further show that ZIKV-induced vacuoles are derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dependent on the PI3K/Akt signaling axis. Inhibiting the Sec61 ER translocon in ZIKV-infected cells blocked vacuole formation and viral production. Our results provide mechanistic insight behind the ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect and indicate that IFITM3, by acting as a gatekeeper for incoming virus, restricts virus takeover of the ER and subsequent cell death.
  3. Stability of Zika Virus in Urine: Specimen Processing Considerations and Implications for the Detection of RNA Targets in Urine.
    • Europe PubMed Central
      • Tan SK; Sahoo MK; Milligan S; Taylor N; Pinsky BA.
      • 2017-05-01  Journal of virological methods
      • DOI: 10.1016/j.jviromet.2017.04.018  ISSN: 0166-0934  PMID: 28472623
        • Detection of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in urine is of increasing interest for the diagnosis of ZIKV infection. Pre-analytical variables can significantly impact the stability of RNA in urine.To determine optimal specimen processing protocols that would maximize detection of ZIKV RNA in urine by real-time, reverse transcriptase PCR, we investigated the effect of temperature, initial ZIKV concentration, use of nucleic acid stabilizers, and time on ZIKV RNA levels. Urine samples from healthy donors were spiked with ZIKV using the Exact Diagnostics® ZIKV Verification Panel, a commercially available panel composed of heat-inactivated ZIKV, at concentrations of 5.0 log10 copies/mL (ZIKV-high) and 4.0 log10 copies/mL (ZIKV-low). Samples were stored at room temperature, 4°C, or -80°C and frozen aliquots were exposed to no stabilizer (urine), Buffer ATL (Qiagen, Germantown, MD), or DNA/RNA Shield (Zymo Research, Irvine, CA).ZIKV RNA levels in urine declined steadily at room temperature, though was not significant by 48hours (ZIKV-high, p=0.09; ZIKV-low, p=0.20). ZIKV RNA titers were consistently higher when stored at 4°C, suggesting that storage at 4°C can slow the progression of RNA degradation. Freezing urine samples at -80°C resulted in a significant loss of detectable ZIKV RNA in the ZIKV-low group. ZIKV RNA was detected in 5/6 replicates at 3 days, 1/6 replicates at 10 days, and 1/3 replicates at 30 days, with findings reproducible on repeat testing. Presence of either nucleic acid stabilizer in urine corrected this effect, and resulted in recovery of ZIKV RNA in all replicates. Use of a nucleic acid stabilizer in the ZIKV-high group did not add incremental benefit for the detection or quantitation of ZIKV RNA.ZIKV RNA is prone to degradation in urine with loss of detectable virus even when specimens are frozen at -80°C for 10 days. Detection of ZIKV-positive urine samples, particularly those containing low ZIKV titers may be aided with the addition of a nucleic acid stabilizer during urine specimen processing.
  4. Stability of Zika Virus in Urine: Specimen Processing Considerations and Implications for the Detection of RNA Targets in Urine.
    • Science.gov (United States)
      • Tan, Susanna K; Sahoo, Malaya K; Milligan, Stephen; Taylor, Nathaniel; Pinsky, Benjamin A
      • 2017-05-01  PubMed
      • DOI: 10.1016/j.jviromet.2017.04.018
      • Keywords: Pre-Analytical, RNA Stability, Urine, Zika virus
        • Detection of Zika virus (ZIKV) RNA in urine is of increasing interest for the diagnosis of ZIKV infection. Pre-analytical variables can significantly impact the stability of RNA in urine. To determine optimal specimen processing protocols that would maximize detection of ZIKV RNA in urine by real-time, reverse transcriptase PCR, we investigated the effect of temperature, initial ZIKV concentration, use of nucleic acid stabilizers, and time on ZIKV RNA levels. Urine samples from healthy donors were spiked with ZIKV using the Exact Diagnostics(®) ZIKV Verification Panel, a commercially available panel composed of heat-inactivated ZIKV, at concentrations of 5.0 log10 copies/mL (ZIKV-high) and 4.0 log10 copies/mL (ZIKV-low). Samples were stored at room temperature, 4°C, or -80°C and frozen aliquots were exposed to no stabilizer (urine), Buffer ATL (Qiagen, Germantown, MD), or DNA/RNA Shield (Zymo Research, Irvine, CA). ZIKV RNA levels in urine declined steadily at room temperature, though was not significant by 48hours (ZIKV-high, p=0.09; ZIKV-low, p=0.20). ZIKV RNA titers were consistently higher when stored at 4°C, suggesting that storage at 4°C can slow the progression of RNA degradation. Freezing urine samples at -80°C resulted in a significant loss of detectable ZIKV RNA in the ZIKV-low group. ZIKV RNA was detected in 5/6 replicates at 3 days, 1/6 replicates at 10 days, and 1/3 replicates at 30 days, with findings reproducible on repeat testing. Presence of either nucleic acid stabilizer in urine corrected this effect, and resulted in recovery of ZIKV RNA in all replicates. Use of a nucleic acid stabilizer in the ZIKV-high group did not add incremental benefit for the detection or quantitation of ZIKV RNA. ZIKV RNA is prone to degradation in urine with loss of detectable virus even when specimens are frozen at -80°C for 10 days. Detection of ZIKV-positive urine samples, particularly those containing low ZIKV titers may be aided with the addition of a nucleic acid stabilizer during urine specimen processing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  5. Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (DZIF) : Schlussbericht der Universität Lübeck (Koordinator) für die Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB): DZIF-Projekt: TTU 01.914 - Tofo Advanced Study Week on Arboviruses: Dengue - Zika – Chikungunya
  6. Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (DZIF) : Schlussbericht der Universität Lübeck (Koordinator) für die Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB): DZIF-Projekt: TTU 01.914 - Tofo Advanced Study Week on Arboviruses: Dengue - Zika – Chikungunya
  7. LAMP shines a light on Zika virus.
    • Europe PubMed Central
      • Smith OM.
      • 2017-05-01  Science (New York, N.Y.)
      • DOI: 10.1126/science.356.6337.497-g  ISSN: 0036-8075  Volume: 356  Issue: 6337  Pages: 497-498  PMID: 28473565
  8. Rapid and specific detection of Asian- and African-lineage Zika viruses.
    • Science.gov (United States)
      • Chotiwan, Nunya; Brewster, Connie D; Magalhaes, Tereza; Weger-Lucarelli, James; Duggal, Nisha K; Rückert, Claudia; Nguyen, Chilinh; Garcia Luna, Selene M; Fauver, Joseph R; Andre, Barb; Gray, Meg; Black, William C; Kading, Rebekah C; Ebel, Gregory D; Kuan, Guillermina; Balmaseda, Angel; Jaenisch, Thomas; Marques, Ernesto T A; Brault, Aaron C; Harris, Eva; Foy, Brian D; Quackenbush, Sandra L; Perera, Rushika; Rovnak, Joel
      • 2017-05-03  PubMed
      • DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aag0538  Volume: 9  Issue: 388
        • Understanding the dynamics of Zika virus transmission and formulating rational strategies for its control require precise diagnostic tools that are also appropriate for resource-poor environments. We have developed a rapid and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that distinguishes Zika viruses of Asian and African lineages. The assay does not detect chikungunya virus or flaviviruses such as dengue, yellow fever, or West Nile viruses. The assay conditions allowed direct detection of Zika virus RNA in cultured infected cells; in mosquitoes; in virus-spiked samples of human blood, plasma, saliva, urine, and semen; and in infected patient serum, plasma, and semen samples without the need for RNA isolation or reverse transcription. The assay offers rapid, specific, sensitive, and inexpensive detection of the Asian-lineage Zika virus strain that is currently circulating in the Western hemisphere, and can also detect the African-lineage Zika virus strain using separate, specific primers. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
  9. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the central roles of two African countries in the evolution and worldwide spread of Zika virus [2015]
    • Agris
      • Shen, Shu; Junming Shiauthor; Jun Wangauthor; Shuang Tangauthor; Hualin Wangauthor; Zhihong Huauthor; Fei Dengauthor
  10. Dengue Virus Immunopathogenesis: Lessons Applicable to the Emergence of Zika Virus [2015]
    • Agris
      • Olagnier, David; Donatella AmatoreauthorDepartment of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome; Luciano CastielloauthorIstituto Pasteur—Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome; Matteo FerrariauthorIstituto Pasteur—Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome; Enrico PalermoauthorIstituto Pasteur—Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome; Michael S. DiamondauthorDepartments of Medicine, Molecular Microbiology, Pathology & Immunology, Washington University at St. Louis, St. Louis, MO; Anna Teresa PalamaraauthorDepartment of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, ItalyIstituto Pasteur—Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome; John HiscottauthorIstituto Pasteur—Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, Rome
  11. Molecular Characterization of Three Zika Flaviviruses Obtained from Sylvatic Mosquitoes in the Central African Republic [2015]
  12. report on the outbreak of Zika virus on Easter Island, South Pacific, 2014 [2016]
    • Agris
      • Tognarelli, J.; Ulloa, S.; Villagra, E.; Lagos, J.; Aguayo, C.; Fasce, R.; Parra, B.; Mora, J.; Becerra, N.; Lagos, N.; Vera, L.; Olivares, B.; Vilches, M.; Fernández, J.
        • Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus circulating in Asia and Africa. In 2013, a large outbreak was reported on the archipelago of French Polynesia. In this study, we report the detection and molecular characterization of Zika virus for the first time in Chile from an outbreak among the inhabitants of Easter Island. A total of 89 samples from patients suspected of having Z ...
  13. Evaluation of Aptima Zika Virus Assay.
    • Science.gov (United States)
      • Ren, Ping; Ortiz, Daniel A; Terzian, Ana C B; Colombo, Tatiana E; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Vasilakis, Nikos; Loeffelholz, Michael J
      • 2017-05-03  PubMed
      • DOI: 10.1128/JCM.00603-17
        • The Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic in the Americas poses a public health emergency that requires a swift response. Accurate and reliable ZIKV diagnostic tests serve as an important tool in limiting the spread of ZIKV infections. The Aptima Zika Virus assay (Hologic, Marlborough, MA) performed on the automated Panther system is a rapid and high-throughput method to detect ZIKV RNA using transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) technology. We evaluated the performance characteristics of the Aptima Zika Virus Assay on clinical serum and urine specimens (n=124) from two different patient populations, and samples spiked with ZIKV from three different lineages (n=10). Compared to the real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) reference method, the Aptima ZIKV assay detected ZIKV RNA with 94.8% (95% CI 89.4-97.6) diagnostic accuracy, 94.7% (95% CI 73.5-99.9) sensitivity, and 94.8% (95% CI 88.9-97.8) specificity. Similar results were obtained regardless of a serum or urine source. The limit of detection of the assay at a 95% detection probability was 11.5 genome copy equivalent per milliliter (GCE/ml) (7.9 - 20.2, 95% fiducial limits) in serum and 17.9 GCE/ml (13.1 - 27.5, 95% fiducial limits) in urine. The Aptima Zika Virus assay results were highly reproducible (99%), and no cross-reactivity was seen when testing a panel of 95 specimens with potentially interfering substances, such as clinically relevant bacteria, fungi, and viruses, including other flaviviruses. The excellent performance characteristics and the convenience of a fully automated testing system makes the Aptima ZIKV assay an attractive choice for clinical laboratories detecting ZIKV RNA from serum and urine. Copyright © 2017 Ren et al.
  14. Selective activation of interferon-γ signaling by Zika virus NS5 protein.
    • Science.gov (United States)
      • Chaudhary, Vidyanath; Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Chan, Ching-Ping; Wang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Jian-Piao; Zhang, Shuo; Liang, Mifang; Kok, Kin-Hang; Chan, Chi-Ping; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Jin, Dong-Yan
      • 2017-05-03  PubMed
      • DOI: 10.1128/JVI.00163-17
        • Severe complications of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection might be caused by inflammation. How ZIKV induces pro-inflammatory cytokines is not understood. In this study, we show opposite regulatory effect of ZIKV NS5 protein on interferon (IFN) signaling. Whereas ZIKV and its NS5 protein were potent suppressors of type I and type III IFN signaling, they were found to activate IFN-γ signaling. Inversely, IFN-γ augmented ZIKV replication. NS5 interacted with STAT2 and targeted it for ubiquitination and degradation, but had no influence on STAT1 stability or nuclear translocation. The recruitment of STAT1-STAT2-IRF9 to IFN-β-stimulated genes was compromised when NS5 was expressed. Concurrently, the formation of STAT1-STAT1 homodimers and their recruitment to IFN-γ-stimulated genes such as pro-inflammatory cytokine CXCL10 were augmented. Silencing the expression of an IFN-γ receptor subunit or treatment of ZIKV-infected cells with a JAK2 inhibitor suppressed viral replication and viral induction of IFN-γ-stimulated genes. Taken together, our findings provide a new mechanism by which ZIKV NS5 protein differentially regulates IFN signaling to facilitate viral replication and to cause diseases. This activity might be shared by a group of viral IFN modulators.IMPORTANCE Mammalian cells produce three types of interferons to combat viral infection and to control host immune response. To replicate and to cause diseases, pathogenic viruses have developed different strategies to defeat the action of host interferons. Many viral proteins including Zika virus (ZIKV) NS5 protein are known to be able to suppress the antiviral property of type I and type III interferons. Here we further showed that ZIKV NS5 protein can also boost the activity of type II interferon to induce cellular proteins that promote inflammation. This was mediated by the differential effect of ZIKV NS5 protein on a pair of cellular transcription factors STAT1 and STAT2. NS5 induced the degradation of STAT2 but promoted the formation of STAT1-STAT1 protein complex that activates genes controlled by type II interferon. A drug that specifically inhibits IFN-γ receptor or STAT1 showed anti-ZIKV effect and might also have anti-inflammatory activity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.
  15. Genomic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Zika virus circulating in the Americas [2015]
    • Agris
      • Ye, Qing; Zhong-Yu LiuauthorDepartment of Virology, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071; Jian-Feng HanauthorDepartment of Virology, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071; Tao JiangauthorDepartment of Virology, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, ChinaState Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing 100071; Xiao-Feng LiauthorDepartment of Virology, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, ChinaState Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing 100071; Cheng-Feng QinauthorDepartment of Virology, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing 100071, ChinaState Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing 100071
  16. Sexual transmission of ZIKV causes fetal growth restriction in mice.
    • Europe PubMed Central
      • Uraki R; Jurado KA; Hwang J; Szigeti-Buck K; Horvath T; Iwasaki A; Fikrig E.
      • 2017-05-01  The Journal of infectious diseases
      • DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jix204  ISSN: 0022-1899  PMID: 28472297
        • Zika virus (ZIKV) can be transmitted via mosquito bite or sexual contact. Using mice that lack the type I interferon receptor we examine sexual transmission of ZIKV. Electron microscopy analyses showed association of virions with developing sperm within testes as well as with mature sperm within epididymis. When ZIKV-infected male mice were mated with naïve female mice, the weight of fetuses at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) was significantly reduced compared with the control group. Additionally, we found ocular deformities in a minority of the fetuses. These results suggest that ZIKV causes fetal abnormalities after female mating with an infected male.
  17. Pathogenesis and Inhibition of Flaviviruses from a Carbohydrate Perspective
    • Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)
      • So Young Kim
      • 2017-05-01  Pharmaceuticals
      • DOI: 10.3390/ph10020044  ISSN: 1424-8247  Volume: 10  Issue: 2  Pages: 44
      • Keywords: dengue virus, DC-SIGN, envelope protein, flavivirus, flavivirus inhibitors, glycosaminoglycans, Japanese encephalitis virus, proteoglycans, viral infection, West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, Zika virus
        • Full Text Available Flaviviruses are enveloped, positive single stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA viruses with various routes of transmission. While the type and severity of symptoms caused by pathogenic flaviviruses vary from hemorrhagic fever to fetal abnormalities, their general mechanism of host cell entry is similar. All pathogenic flaviviruses, such as dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and Zika virus, bind to glycosaminglycans (GAGs through the putative GAG binding sites within their envelope proteins to gain access to the surface of host cells. GAGs are long, linear, anionic polysaccharides with a repeating disaccharide unit and are involved in many biological processes, such as cellular signaling, cell adhesion, and pathogenesis. Flavivirus envelope proteins are N-glycosylated surface proteins, which interact with C-type lectins, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN through their glycans. In this review, we discuss both host and viral surface receptors that have the carbohydrate components, focusing on the surface interactions in the early stage of flavivirus entry. GAG-flavivirus envelope protein interactions as well as interactions between flavivirus envelope proteins and DC-SIGN are discussed in detail. This review also examines natural and synthetic inhibitors of flaviviruses that are carbohydrate-based or carbohydrate-targeting. Both advantages and drawbacks of these inhibitors are explored, as are potential strategies to improve their efficacy to ultimately help eradicate flavivirus infections.
  18. Flavivirus cross-reactivity, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient: Comment response.
    • Europe PubMed Central
      • Raboni SM; Duarte Dos Santos CN.
      • 2017-05-01  Transplant infectious disease : an official journal of the Transplantation Society
      • DOI: 10.1111/tid.12719  ISSN: 1398-2273  PMID: 28474860
        • Concerning the letter by Joob and Wiwanitkit1 about our article "Flavivirus cross-reactivity, Guillain-Barré syndrome [GBS] and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient,"2 we would like to emphasize that we hypothesized that GBS in the studied case could be a result of a previous flavivirus infection or caused by infection with both viruses. We have based our hypothesis on the clinical records obtained during the Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemics in Latin America. Similarly to what occurs in Southeast Asia, Brazil has annually undergone several outbreaks of dengue since its re-introduction in the Americas in 1986. During the 2015/2016 ZIKV outbreak that occurred in Brazil, unusually high rates of GBS and congenital syndromes were observed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Keywords: Research; Abstracts; Zika Virus.

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