8/08/2013

Case Definitions, Diagnostic Algorithms, and Priorities in Encephalitis: Consensus Statement of the International Encephalitis Consortium (Clin Infect Dis., abstract, edited)

[Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Case Definitions, Diagnostic Algorithms, and Priorities in Encephalitis: Consensus Statement of the International Encephalitis Consortium

A. Venkatesan 1, A. R. Tunkel 2, K. C. Bloch 3,4, A. S. Lauring 5, J. Sejvar 6, A. Bitnun 7, J-P. Stahl 8, A. Mailles 9, M. Drebot 10, C. E. Rupprecht 11, J. Yoder 12, J. R. Cope 12, M. R. Wilson 13,14, R. J. Whitley 15,16,17,18, J. Sullivan 19, J. Granerod 20, C. Jones 21,22, K. Eastwood 23, K. N. Ward 20,24, D. N. Durrheim 25,26, M. V. Solbrig 27, L. Guo-Dong 28, C. A. Glaser 29, on behalf of the International Encephalitis Consortium

Author Affiliations: 1Johns Hopkins Encephalitis Center, Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 2Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 3Departments of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and 4Preventive Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 5Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor 6Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 7Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada 8Infectious Diseases Department, CHU and University 1, Grenoble, France 9Department Infectious Diseases, French Institute for Public Health Surveillance, Saint-Maurice, France 10National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba 11Global Alliance For Rabies Control, Manhattan, Kansas 12Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 13Departments of Neurology and 14Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts 15Departments of Pediatrics 16Microbiology 17Medicine, and 18Neurosurgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham  19Central Clinical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 20Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, London 21Sydney Emerging Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity Institute, and 22The Children's Hospital Westmead Clinical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales 23Hunter New England Population Health, Wallsend, New South Wales, Australia 24Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, England  25University of Newcastle, and 26Hunter Medical Research Institute, Wallsend, New South Wales, Australia 27Department of Medicine (Neurology) and Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada 28Department of Viral Encephalitis and Arbovirus, State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 29Division of Communicable Disease Control, California Department of Public Health, Richmond

Correspondence: Arun Venkatesan, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St, Meyer 6-113, Baltimore, MD 21287 (avenkat2@jhmi.edu).

 

Abstract

Background.

Encephalitis continues to result in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances in diagnosis and management have been limited, in part, by a lack of consensus on case definitions, standardized diagnostic approaches, and priorities for research.

Methods.

In March 2012, the International Encephalitis Consortium, a committee begun in 2010 with members worldwide, held a meeting in Atlanta to discuss recent advances in encephalitis and to set priorities for future study.

Results.

We present a consensus document that proposes a standardized case definition and diagnostic guidelines for evaluation of adults and children with suspected encephalitis. In addition, areas of research priority, including host genetics and selected emerging infections, are discussed.

Conclusions.

We anticipate that this document, representing a synthesis of our discussions and supported by literature, will serve as a practical aid to clinicians evaluating patients with suspected encephalitis and will identify key areas and approaches to advance our knowledge of encephalitis.

Key words: encephalitis – guidelines – viral – autoimmune - host genetics

Received May 10, 2013. Accepted July 3, 2013.

© The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.

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