17 May 2013

Population-level antibody estimates to novel influenza A/H7N9 (J Infect Dis., abstract, edited)

[Source: The Journal of Infectious Diseases, full free text: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Population-level antibody estimates to novel influenza A/H7N9

Maciej F Boni 1,2, Nguyen Van Vinh Chau 3, Nguyen Dong 4, Stacy Todd 1,5, Nguyen Thi Duy Nhat 1, Erwin de Bruin 6, Janko van Beek 6,7, Nguyen Tran Hien 8, Cameron P Simmons 1,2,9, Jeremy Farrar 1,2 and Marion Koopmans 6,7

Author Affiliations: 1Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  2Centre for Tropical Medicine, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK  3The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam  4Khanh Hoa Provincial Hospital, Nha Trang, Vietnam  5Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK  6National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands 7Department of Virology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands 8National Institute for Hygiene and Epidemiology, Hanoi, Vietnam 9Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Correspondence: Maciej F Boni, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Hospital for Tropical Diseases, 764 Vo Van Kiet Street, District 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, Email: mboni@oucru.org, Tel +84 83 923 7954, Fax +84 83 923 8904

 

Abstract

There are no contemporary data available describing human immunity to novel influenza A/H7N9. Using 1723 prospectively collected serum samples in southern Vietnam, we tested for antibodies to five avian influenza antigens using a protein microarray. General-population antibody titers against subtype H7 virus are higher than antibody titers against subtype H5, and lower than titers against H9. The highest titers were observed for human influenza subtypes. Titers to avian influenza antigens increased with age and with geometric mean antibody titer to human influenza antigens. There were no titer differences between the urban and the rural location in our study.

Received April 15, 2013. Revision received May 8, 2013. Accepted May 14, 2013.

© The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

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