2/07/2013

Large measles outbreak in Geneva, Switzerland, January to August 2011: descriptive epidemiology and demonstration of quarantine effectiveness (Euro Surveill., abstract, edited)

[Source: Eurosurveillance, full text: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Eurosurveillance, Volume 18, Issue 6, 07 February 2013

Surveillance and outbreak reports

Large measles outbreak in Geneva, Switzerland, January to August 2011: descriptive epidemiology and demonstration of quarantine effectiveness

E Delaporte1, C A Wyler Lazarevic2, A Iten3, P Sudre ()1

  1. Epidemiology and infectious diseases section, Cantonal Health Service, General Directorate for Health, Geneva, Switzerland
  2. Youth Health Service, Department of Education, Geneva, Switzerland
  3. Hospital Infection control Service, Cantonal University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland

Citation style for this article: Delaporte E, Wyler Lazarevic CA, Iten A, Sudre P. Large measles outbreak in Geneva, Switzerland, January to August 2011: descriptive epidemiology and demonstration of quarantine effectiveness . Euro Surveill. 2013;18(6):pii=20395. Available online: http://www.eurosurveillance.org/ViewArticle.aspx?ArticleId=20395
Date of submission: 23 April 2012


Between January and August 2011, the canton of Geneva, Switzerland, experienced a large measles outbreak with 219 cases (47 cases per 100,000 inhabitants) in the context of an extensive epidemic in a neighbouring region of France. Most cases were young adults (median age: 18 years), often unaware of their vaccination status. The vast majority of cases were either not (81%) or incompletely vaccinated (8%). Thirty clusters with a total of 119 cases and a median cluster size of three (range: 2–15 cases) were identified. Overall, 44 cases were imported or linked to imported cases. Of 73 contacts of cases who were quarantined, 50 developed measles and caused six secondary cases. This compares to 81 secondary cases among 173 non-quarantined cases (relative risk: 0.26; 95% confidence interval: 0.06–0.65), demonstrating the effectiveness of well targeted quarantine measures in reducing transmission.

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