BOA1

21 Apr 2015

#Fukushima #plant pumps halted, #toxic #water leaking into #ocean (Kyodo News, April 21 2015)

[Source: Kyodo News, full page: (LINK).]

15:57 21 April 2015

Fukushima plant pumps halted, toxic water leaking into ocean [   /!\   ]

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Tuesday it has found all of the eight water transfer pumps halted at its stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, leaving radiation-contaminated water to leak into the Pacific Ocean.

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The #Mediterranean #Migrant #Crisis, by the #Numbers (Foreign Policy, April 21 2015)

[Source: Foreign Policy, full page: (LINK).]

The Mediterranean Migrant Crisis, by the Numbers [   SOC   ]

The humanitarian crisis along Europe’s southern border seems to ebb and flow from the public consciousness with every mass drowning in the Mediterranean Sea. And with the news that as many as 700 people died when an overloaded boat headed from Libya to Italy capsized, European leaders are rushing to figure out a response to a crisis that shows no signs of slowing.

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The #Effect of Reactive #School #Closure on #Community #Influenza-Like Illness Counts in the State of #Michigan During the 2009 #H1N1 #Pandemic (Clin Infect Dis., abstract, edited)

[Source: Clinical Infectious Diseases, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

The Effect of Reactive School Closure on Community Influenza-Like Illness Counts in the State of Michigan During the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic [      ]

Brian M. Davis 1, Howard Markel 2, Alex Navarro 2, Eden Wells 1, Arnold S. Monto 1, and Allison E. Aiello 3

Author Affiliations: 1Epidemiology Department, University of Michigan School of Public Health 2Center for the History of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor 3Epidemiology Department, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill

Correspondence: Howard Markel, MD, PhD, 102 Observatory St, Rm 5725, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (howard@umich.edu).

 

Abstract

In sum, 559 Michigan schools were closed as a nonpharmaceutical intervention during the influenza A 2009 (H1N1) pandemic. By linking the proportion of schools closed within a district to state influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance data, we measured its effect on community levels of ILI. This analysis was centered by the peak week of ILI for each school district, and a negative binomial model compared three levels of school closure: 0%, 1%–50%, and 51%–100% of schools closed from three weeks leading up to ILI peak to four weeks following ILI peak rate. We observed that school closures were reactive, and there was no statistically significant difference between ILI rates over the study period. There was an elevated rate ratio for ILI at 51%–100% closure, and a reduction in the rate ratio at the 1%–50% compared to the 0% closure level. These findings suggest that district level reactive school closures were ineffective.

Key words: influenza - influenza-like illness - school closure - nonpharmaceutical interventions

Received November 13, 2014. Accepted February 27, 2015.

© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

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#Governor Scott Walker Authorizes #National #Guard to Assist in #Response to #Avian #Flu #Outbreak (#Wisconsin Office of the Governor, April 21 2015, edited)

[Source: US State of Wisconsin Office of the Governor, full page: (LINK). Edited.]

Governor Scott Walker Authorizes National Guard to Assist in Response to Avian Flu Outbreak [  /!\   ]

Monday, April 20, 2015 - Press Release

Madison – Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker today signed Executive Order #156, authorizing the Wisconsin National Guard to assist authorities in the response to the avian influenza virus affecting Jefferson, Juneau, and Barron Counties.

“We must act quickly and efficiently to contain the outbreak and protect domestic poultry,” Governor Walker said.  “It is important to note, however, there is no threat to humans with the avian flu outbreak.”

According to the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP), avian influenza virus has been detected in three Wisconsin poultry flocks, affecting tens of thousands of chickens and turkeys.  Read more here.

Governor Walker’s Executive Order allows the Wisconsin National Guard to assist in the response and help contain the outbreak, as well as offer assistance in site clean-up. 

The state veterinarian, through DATCP, requested up to 14 Guard personnel be made available, on a rotating schedule, for immediate assistance. 

This assistance from the Wisconsin National Guard is necessary because federal resources are thin, due to avian influenza virus outbreaks in other states, particularly in the Midwest.

If you find a sick or dead bird, do not touch it.  For domestic birds, call DATCP’s Division of Animal Health at 1-800-572-8981, and for wild birds, call the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources at 1-800-433-1810

A copy of Executive Order #156 is attached.

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See more at: http://walker.wi.gov/newsroom/press-release/governor-scott-walker-authorizes-national-guard-assist-response-avian-flu#sthash.8onXaZga.dpuf

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[Source: US State of Wisconsin Office of the Governor, full PDF document: http://walker.wi.gov/sites/default/files/documents/EO%20%23156.pdf ]

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EXECUTIVE ORDER #156

  • Relating to the Declaration of a State of Emergency in Response to an Animal Disease Incident in the State of Wisconsin
    • WHEREAS, the introduction of pathogenic avian influenza (HP AI) has affected the State ofWisconsin; and
    • WHEREAS, such an animal health incident poses risks to health and safety in the State ofWisconsin; and
    • WHEREAS, the counties of Jefferson, Barron and Juneau have been affected by HPAI beginning on Apri110'h and April 14'h, 2015, respectively;
  • NOW THEREFORE, I, SCOTT WALKER, Governor of the State of Wisconsin, by the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of this State, and specifically by sections 321.39, 323.10, and 323.12 of the Wisconsin Statutes, do hereby:
    • 1. Proclaim that a State of Emergency exists throughout the State of Wisconsin, and is currently focused in Jefferson, Barron and Juneau counties; and
    • 2. Designate the WEM Administrator as the State Coordinating Officer to coordinate all state agencies of the State of Wisconsin to assist in the response and recovery efforts to this situation; and
    • 3. Call to state active duty such elements of the Wisconsin National Guard as the Adjutant General deems necessary to assist civil authorities for purposes of assisting in response and recovery efforts as well as providing security and other essential services; and
    • 4. Authorize the Adjutant General to utilize personnel called to state active duty pursuant to this order in emergency status; and
    • 5. Authorize the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection to issue area-wide quarantine orders for feed, poultry and poultry products.

By the Governor:

 

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#US #BirdFlu #Outbreak Expands to 5.3 Million #Hens in #Iowa (Bloomberg Business, April 21 2015)

[Source: Bloomberg, full page: (LINK).]

U.S. Bird Flu Outbreak Expands to 5.3 Million Hens in Iowa [      ]

by Megan Durisin / 11:05 PM CEST  April 20, 2015

Iowa reported that a flock of 5.3 million chickens at an egg-laying facility in Osceola County has bird flu, the biggest outbreak of the virus reported in the U.S.

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#Research Articles #Abstracts on #Influenza & Other Respiratory #Viruses–April 21 2015 Issue

[Source: AMEDEO, homepage: (LINK).]

#Research Articles #Abstracts on #Influenza & Other Respiratory #Viruses–April 21 2015 Issue [   R   ]

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This Week’s Abstracts:

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Ann Intern Med

  1. FERNANDEZ LM, Girdler RV, Wright RB, Harper DM, et al
    • IIV3 reduced flu in HIV- pregnant women and infants, and in HIV+ pregnant women but not their infants.
  2. PODOLSKY SH
    • Serotherapy for Ebola: back to the future.

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Antiviral Res

  1. HUI KP, Kuok DI, Kang SS, Li HS, et al
    • Modulation of sterol biosynthesis regulates viral replication and cytokine production in influenza A virus infected human alveolar epithelial cells.
      • Antiviral Res. 2015 Apr 13. pii: S0166-3542(15)00085.

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BMJ

  1. JONES M
    • Mark Jones's reply to Myles and Leonardi-Bee's response to his critique of their paper reported in The BMJ.
  2. MYLES PR, Leonardi-Bee J
    • Authors' reply to Mark Jones's critique of the study by Muthuri and colleagues reported in The BMJ.
  3. MYLES PR, Leonardi-Bee J
    • Authors' reply to Mark Jones's second critique of the study by Muthuri and colleagues reported in The BMJ.

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Cell

  1. CHEN YH, Du W, Hagemeijer MC, Takvorian PM, et al
    • Phosphatidylserine vesicles enable efficient en bloc transmission of enteroviruses.

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Epidemiol Infect

  1. BROUSSEAU N, Green HK, Andrews N, Pryse R, et al
    • Impact of influenza vaccination on respiratory illness rates in children attending private boarding schools in England, 2013-2014: a cohort study.

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J Gen Virol

  1. GAO H, Sun H, Hu J, Qi L, et al
    • The 20 amino acids at the C-terminus of PA-X are associated with increased influenza A virus replication and pathogenicity.
      • J Gen Virol. 2015 Apr 15. pii: vir.0.000143. doi: 10.1099/vir.0.000143.

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J Immunol

  1. MILNER JJ, Rebeles J, Dhungana S, Stewart DA, et al
    • Obesity Increases Mortality and Modulates the Lung Metabolome during Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus Infection in Mice.
  2. NIELSEN CM, White MJ, Bottomley C, Lusa C, et al
    • Impaired NK Cell Responses to Pertussis and H1N1 Influenza Vaccine Antigens in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Individuals.

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J Infect Dis

  1. TSANG TK, Cowling BJ, Fang VJ, Chan KH, et al
    • Influenza A virus shedding and infectivity in households.
  2. ECKARD L, Webby R
    • Neuraminidase: another piece of the influenza vaccine puzzle.
  3. MONTO AS, Petrie JG, Cross RT, Johnson E, et al
    • Antibody to the influenza neuraminidase: an independent correlate of protection.
  4. AVADHANULA V, Chemaly RF, Shah DP, Ghantoji SS, et al
    • Infection with novel respiratory syncytial virus genotype Ontario (ON1) in adult hematopoietic cell transplant recipients, Texas, 2011-2013.

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J Virol

  1. DA COSTA B, Sausset A, Munier S, Ghounaris A, et al
    • Temperature-sensitive mutants in the influenza A virus RNA polymerase: alterations in the PA linker reduce nuclear targeting of the PB1-PA dimer and hence result in viral attenuation.
  2. FIEGE JK, Langlois RA
    • Investigating Influenza A virus infection: Tools to track infection and tropism.
  3. DENG G, Shi J, Wang J, Kong H, et al
    • Genetics, receptor binding, and virulence in mice of H10N8 influenza viruses isolated from ducks and chickens in live poultry markets in China.
  4. HAYASHI T, MacDonald LA, Takimoto T
    • Influenza A virus protein PA-X contributes to viral growth and suppression of the host antiviral and immune responses.
  5. KHAPERSKYY DA, McCormick C
    • Timing Is Everything: Coordinated Control of Host Shutoff by Influenza A Virus NS1 and PA-X Proteins.

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PLoS One

  1. SANGKET U, Vijasika S, Noh H, Chantratita W, et al
    • SNPer: An R Library for Quantitative Variant Analysis on Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms among Influenza Virus Populations.
  2. WENG TC, Chan TC, Lin HT, Chang CK, et al
    • Early Detection for Cases of Enterovirus- and Influenza-Like Illness through a Newly Established School-Based Syndromic Surveillance System in Taipei, January 2010 ~ August 2011.
  3. SATO AP, Antunes JL, Moura RF, de Andrade FB, et al
    • Factors Associated to Vaccination against Influenza among Elderly in a Large Brazilian Metropolis.
  4. CHUANG YC, Huang YL, Tseng KC, Yen CH, et al
    • Social Capital and Health-Protective Behavior Intentions in an Influenza Pandemic.
  5. GUAN WD, Gong XY, Mok CK, Chen TT, et al
    • Surveillance for Seasonal Influenza Virus Prevalence in Hospitalized Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Guangzhou, China during the Post-Pandemic Era.
  6. KOSIK I, Praznovska M, Kosikova M, Bobisova Z, et al
    • The Ubiquitination of the Influenza A Virus PB1-F2 Protein Is Crucial for Its Biological Function.
  7. SADASIVAN S, Zanin M, O'Brien K, Schultz-Cherry S, et al
    • Induction of Microglia Activation after Infection with the Non-Neurotropic A/CA/04/2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus.
  8. YANG X, Zhao J, Wang C, Duan Y, et al
    • Immunization with a Live Attenuated H7N9 Influenza Vaccine Protects Mice against Lethal Challenge.
  9. HELMEKE C, Grafe L, Irmscher HM, Gottschalk C, et al
    • Effectiveness of the 2012/13 Trivalent Live and Inactivated Influenza Vaccines in Children and Adolescents in Saxony-Anhalt, Germany: A Test-Negative Case-Control Study.
  10. LIN CJ, Lin HJ, Chen TH, Hsu YA, et al
    • Correction: Polygonum cuspidatum and Its Active Components Inhibit Replication of the Influenza Virus through Toll-Like Receptor 9-Induced Interferon Beta Expression.

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Vaccine

  1. LAI CH, Tang N, Jan JT, Huang MH, et al
    • Use of recombinant flagellin in oil-in-water emulsions enhances hemagglutinin-specific mucosal IgA production and IL-17 secreting T cells against H5N1 avian influenza virus infection.
      • Vaccine. 2015 Apr 6. pii: S0264-410X(15)00401.
  2. ORTQVIST A, Bennet R, Hamrin J, Rinder MR, et al
    • Long term effectiveness of adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in children.
      • Vaccine. 2015 Apr 10. pii: S0264-410X(15)00464.
  3. JIMENEZ-JORGE S, Pozo F, Larrauri A, de Mateo S, et al
    • Interim influenza vaccine effectiveness: A good proxy for final estimates in Spain in the last four seasons 2010-2014.
      • Vaccine. 2015 Apr 10. pii: S0264-410X(15)00359.
  4. ALFELALI M, Barasheed O, Tashani M, Azeem MI, et al
    • Changes in the prevalence of influenza-like illness and influenza vaccine uptake among Hajj pilgrims: A 10-year retrospective analysis of data.
      • Vaccine. 2015 Apr 14. pii: S0264-410X(15)00459.

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Virology

  1. WANG W, Mu X, Zhao L, Wang J, et al
    • Transcriptional response of human umbilical vein endothelial cell to H9N2 influenza virus infection.
  2. WU W, Zhang W, Duggan ES, Booth JL, et al
    • RIG-I and TLR3 are both required for maximum interferon induction by influenza virus in human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

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Virus Res

  1. MARTINELLI M, Frati ER, Zappa A, Ebranati E, et al
    • Phylogeny and population dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (Rsv) A and B.

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20 Apr 2015

Understanding the #Emergence of #Ebola Virus #Disease in #SierraLeone: Stalking the Virus in the Threatening Wake of Emergence (PLOS Currents Outbreaks, abstract, edited)

[Source: PLoS Currents Outbreaks, full page: (LINK). Abstract, edited.]

Understanding the Emergence of Ebola Virus Disease in Sierra Leone: Stalking the Virus in the Threatening Wake of Emergence [      ]

April 20, 2015 · Research

Citation: Wauquier N, Bangura J, Moses L, Humarr Khan S, Coomber M, Lungay V, Gbakie M, Sesay MS, Gassama IA, Massally JL, Gbakima A, Squire J, Lamin M, Kanneh L, Yillah M, Kargbo K, Roberts W, Vandi M, Kargbo D, Vincent T, Jambai A, Guttieri M, Fair J, Souris M, Gonzalez JP. Understanding the Emergence of Ebola Virus Disease in Sierra Leone: Stalking the Virus in the Threatening Wake of Emergence. PLOS Currents Outbreaks. 2015 Apr 20. Edition 1. doi: 10.1371/currents.outbreaks.9a6530ab7bb9096b34143230ab01cdef.

Authors: Nadia Wauquier Sorbonne Université, UPMC, Paris, France. James Bangura Metabiota Inc., Freetown, Sierra Leone. Lina Moses Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Sheik Humarr Khan Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Moinya Coomber Metabiota Inc., Kenema Government Hospital, Kenema, Sierra Leone. Victor Lungay Metabiota Inc., Freetown, Sierra Leone; Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Michael Gbakie Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA; Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Mohammed S.K. Sesay Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Ibrahim A.K. Gassama Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. James L.B. Massally Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Aiah Gbakima Metabiota Inc., Freetown, Sierra Leone. James Squire Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Mohamed Lamin Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Lansana Kanneh Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. Mohammed Yillah Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Kandeh Kargbo Metabiota Inc., Freetown, Sierra Leone. Willie Roberts Metabiota Inc., Freetown, Sierra Leone; Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Mohammed Vandi Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. David Kargbo Directorate of Disease Prevention and Control, DPC Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Freetown, Sierra Leone. Tom Vincent Metabiota Inc., Silver Spring and San Francisco, USA. Amara Jambai Ministry of Heath and Sanitation, Sierra Leone. Mary Guttieri Metabiota Inc., Silver Spring and San Francisco, USA. Joseph Fair Fondation Mérieux USA, Washington DC, USA. Marc Souris UMRD 190 Emergence des Pathologies Virales, IRD, Aix-Marseille University, Vientiane, Laos. Jean Paul Gonzalez Metabiota Inc., Silver Spring and San Francisco, USA.

 

Abstract

Since Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) was first identified in 1976 in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo, and despite the numerous outbreaks recorded to date, rarely has an epidemic origin been identified. Indeed, among the twenty-one most documented EVD outbreaks in Africa, an index case has been identified four times, and hypothesized in only two other instances. The initial steps of emergence and spread of a virus are critical in the development of a potential outbreak and need to be thoroughly dissected and understood in order to improve on preventative strategies. In the current West African outbreak of EVD, a unique index case has been identified, pinpointing the geographical origin of the epidemic in Guinea. Herein, we provide an accounting of events that serve as the footprint of EVD emergence in Sierra Leone and a road map for risk mitigation fueled by lessons learned.

 

Funding Statement

This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under the Academic Engagement Program (AEP) Contract No. HDTRA1-14-C-0104 and under the Cooperative and Biological Engagement program (CBEP) Contract No. HDTRA1-12-C-0024. The results and ideas presented here do not necessarily represent the point of view of the funders and the US government agencies.

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Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N1, #BurkinaFaso [7 new #poultry #outbreaks] (#OIE World Animal Health Information System, April 20 2015, edited)

[Source: OIE, full page: (LINK). Edited.]

Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, Burkina Faso [      ]

Information received on 20/04/2015 from Dr Lassina Ouattara, Directeur Général, Services Vétérinaires, Ministère des Ressources Animales et Halieutiques, OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso

  • Summary
    • Report type Follow-up report No. 1
    • Date of start of the event 10/02/2015
    • Date of confirmation of the event 31/03/2015
    • Report date 17/04/2015
    • Date submitted to OIE 20/04/2015
    • Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
    • Date of previous occurrence 22/05/2006
    • Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
    • Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
    • Serotype H5N1
    • Nature of diagnosis Clinical, Laboratory (advanced)
    • This event pertains to the whole country
    • Related reports
  • New outbreaks (7)
    • Outbreak 1  - Djikando, Gaoua, PONI
      • Date of start of the outbreak 30/03/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 338 – 242 – 242 – 0 – 96
        • Affected population The population consisted of layer hens
    • Outbreak 2  - Bobo Dioulasso, Bobo, HOUET
      • Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 780 – 780 – 780 – 0 – 0
        • Affected population The population consisted of layer hens
    • Outbreak 3  - Boassa, Bonheurville, Commune d''Ouagadougou, KADIOGO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 5000 – 5000 – 5000 – 0 – 0
        • Affected population A modern farm with layer hens
    • Outbreak 4  - Godé, Sabou, BOULKIEMDE
      • Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Backyard
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 30000 – 500 – 500 – 0 – 0
        • Affected population A traditional farm
    • Outbreak 5  - Tanlarghin, Gampela, Saaba, KADIOGO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Backyard
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 5400 – 145 – 145 – 0 – 467
        • Affected population Chickens, guinea fowls and pigeons
    • Outbreak 6  - Banakeledaga, Bama, HOUET
      • Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Backyard
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 500 – 350 – 350 – 0 – 150
        • Affected population A traditional farm consisting of turkeys, chickens, guinea fowls and pigeons
    • Outbreak 7  - Barogo, Saaba, KADIOGO
      • Date of start of the outbreak 10/04/2015
      • Outbreak status Continuing (or date resolved not provided)
      • Epidemiological unit Farm
      • Affected animals: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
        • Birds  - 7700 – 4291 – 4291 – 0 – 3409
        • Affected population The population consisted of starter chicks
    • Summary of outbreaks
      • Total outbreaks: 7
        • Total animals affected: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
          • Birds – 49718 – 11308 – 11308 – 0 – 4122
        • Outbreak statistics: Species - Apparent morbidity rate - Apparent mortality rate - Apparent case fatality rate - Proportion susceptible animals lost*
          • Birds - 22.74% - 22.74% - 100.00%  - 31.04%
          • *Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
  • Epidemiology
    • Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
      • Unknown or inconclusive
  • Epidemiological comments
    • Orders at province level declaring the infection.
    • Identification of farms in the outbreak area.
    • Identification of poultry in the outbreaks.
    • Stamping out of poultry in the outbreaks.
    • Disinfection of premises.
    • Movement restrictions.
    • Strengthening epidemiological surveillance.
    • Sampling for detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.
  • Control measures
    • Measures applied
      • Movement control inside the country
      • Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
      • Modified stamping out
      • No vaccination
      • No treatment of affected animals
    • Measures to be applied
      • No other measures
  • Diagnostic test results
    • Laboratory name and type – Species – Test - Test date – Result
      • National Livestock Laboratory (National laboratory) – Birds - polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - 02/04/2015 – Positive
      • National Livestock Laboratory (National laboratory) – Birds - polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - 10/04/2015 – Positive
  • Future Reporting
    • The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

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#Nigeria, Unidentified #disease #outbreak not infectious - Minister of Health assures Nigerians (@WHO, Regional Office for Africa, April 20 2015)

[Source: World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa, full page: (LINK).]

Unidentified disease outbreak not infectious - Minister of Health assures Nigerians [   ?   ]

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Abuja, 20 April 2015

The Minister of State for Health, Mr. Fidelis Nwankwo has debunked the rumors of unidentified disease outbreak which is attributed to 19 deaths since 15th April 2015, out of 24 reported cases. He further provided insights on the causes of illness and sudden deaths in two communities of Irele, Local Government Area (LGA) in Ondo State of Nigeria.

On 15th April when the disease was first reported, health officials from the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH), government agencies (including the Nigeria Center for Disease Control) and experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) were deployed to Irele, LGA in south-western Nigeria to investigate rumors of the unidentified disease outbreak.

The Minister in his speech at a press briefing held at the conference hall of the FMOH in Abuja on Monday 20 April, also disclosed that as at the time of the briefing “no new cases have been reported in the past 100 hours and no related mortality in the last 72 hours. We therefore believe that the situation is under control”.

He also stated that preliminary epidemiological and laboratory investigations indicate that the disease is not attributed to any infectious disease.

According to the Minister, “epidemiological findings indicate a strong linkage of the outbreak with the consumption of local gin that might have been contaminated with methanol”. He however added that laboratory investigation is ongoing.

Mr. Nwankwo requested the journalists to use their media outfits to create more awareness and encourage the public to remain calm but vigilant and continue to report any events of public health concern to the nearest health authorities.

Also speaking at the press briefing, the WHO Country Representative in Nigeria, Dr Rui Gama Vaz commended the Ondo state government for the rapid response and the immediate deployment of its epidemiological structure to investigate and mitigate the situation.

Dr Vaz assured the Minister and the public that “WHO will continue to provide technical support to the FMOH and related agencies, to strengthen surveillance at community level for early case identification; the associated risk factors and to create awareness to avert  similar situations in future”.

Available records showed that the reported cases were among males, between the ages of 20 and 75 years old. Equally, 71% had history of having consumed locally brewed gin and were farmers. Symptoms of the unidentified disease include sudden blurred vision, headache, and loss of consciousness followed by death, all occurring within 24 hours of onset.

For further information please contact: Dr  Cephas Ityunguzul, Tel: +234 803 700 9963, Email: ityonzughulc@who.int / Ms. Charity Warigon, Tel: +234 810 221 0093, Email: warigonc@who.int

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#Indiana, #Governor Pence Extends #Public #Health #Emergency in Response to #HIV #Epidemic in Scott County (IN.GOV, April 20 2015)

[Source: US State of Indiana Administration, full page: (LINK).]

Governor Pence Extends Public Health Emergency in Response to HIV Epidemic in Scott County [      ]

Start Date: 4/20/2015 / Start Time:  12:00 AM / End Date: 4/20/2015

 

Entry Description

INDIANAPOLIS—Governor Mike Pence today signed Executive Order 15-06, which extends the public health emergency in Scott County due to an unprecedented outbreak of HIV. The original public health emergency was declared on March 26, 2015, when the Governor signed Executive Order 15-05, which ordered the state to coordinate a multi-agency response and provided additional resources and tools to tackle the outbreak.

“We have no higher priority than the health and safety of our citizens,” said Governor Pence. “Today, on the recommendations of the Indiana State Department of Health and in consultation with Scott County officials and the Centers for Disease Control, I used my authority as Governor to extend the public health emergency in Scott County for an additional thirty days. While we’ve made progress in identifying and treating those affected by this heartbreaking epidemic, the public health emergency continues and so must our efforts to fight it.”

As of April 17, the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has 128 confirmed cases and 6 preliminary cases of HIV in Scott County related to the outbreak in southeastern Indiana. Typically, Scott County would see fewer than five new HIV cases in a year. All cases are linked to injection drug abuse.

Pursuant to IC 10-14-3-12(a) a state of disaster emergency may not continue for longer than thirty days unless the state of disaster emergency is renewed by the governor. Executive Order 15-05 would have expired on April 24, 2015. The administration will continue to monitor the HIV outbreak to determine whether a further extension is necessary.

For more information, call the HIV assistance hotline 866-588-4948 and the Addiction Hotline at 800-662-HELP(4357).

The Governor’s Executive Order 15-06 can be found attached. Executive Order 15-05 can be found here and the press release from March 26 is available here

Location Information: Scott County

Contact Information: Name: Kara Brooks, Phone: 317-232-1622, Email: kbrooks@gov.in.gov

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