24 Oct 2014

#Wisconsin Reported a human infection with #H3N2v swine influenza virus (@CDCgov, FluView, October 24 2014, edited)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), FluView, full page: (LINK).]

#Wisconsin Reported a human infection with #H3N2v swine influenza virus [      ][      ]

(…)

Novel Influenza A Viruses:

One human infection with a novel influenza A virus was reported by Wisconsin.

The person was infected with an influenza A (H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus, and has completely recovered from their illness.

No ongoing human-to-human transmission has been identified and the case patient reported close contact with swine in the week prior to illness onset.

This is the first H3N2v infection reported for the 2014-2015 influenza season, which began on September 28, 2014.

Early identification and investigation of human infections with novel influenza A viruses is critical in order to evaluate the extent of the outbreak and possible human-to-human transmission.

Additional information on influenza in swine, variant influenza infection in humans, and strategies to interact safely with swine can be found at http://www.cdc.gov/flu/swineflu/h3n2v-case-count.htm.

(…)

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#WHO convenes #industry #leaders and key #partners to discuss #trials and #production of #Ebola #vaccine (@WHO, October 24 2014)

[Source: World Health Organization, full page: (LINK).]

WHO convenes industry leaders and key partners to discuss trials and production of Ebola vaccine [      ]

News release / 24 October 2014 ¦ GENEVA

WHO convened a meeting with high-ranking government representatives from Ebola-affected countries and development partners, civil society, regulatory agencies, vaccine manufacturers and funding agencies yesterday to discuss and agree on how to fast track testing and deployment of vaccines in sufficient numbers to impact the Ebola epidemic.

 

Key consensus commitments achieved during the meeting

  • Results from phase 1 clinical trials of most advanced vaccines are expected to be available in December 2014 and efficacy trials in affected countries also will begin in this timeframe, with protocols adapted to take into consideration safety and immunogenicity results as they become available.
  • Pharmaceutical companies developing the vaccines committed to ramp up production capacity for millions of doses to be available in 2015, with several hundred thousand ready before the end of the first half of the year. Regulatory authorities in countries where the vaccines are manufactured and in Africa committed to supporting this goal by working under extremely short deadlines.
  • Community engagement is key and work should be scaled up urgently in partnership between local communities, national governments, NGOs and international organizations.

WHO was called upon by all parties to ensure coordination between the various actors.

Vaccines may have a major impact on further evolution of the epidemic. All parties are working together to finalize the most rapid approach for developing and distributing vaccines, including direct engagement with affected communities, so that effective treatments and prevention methods are embraced and shared far and wide by the most effective ambassadors, the communities themselves.

Trials of vaccines have already begun in the U.S., U.K., and Mali, and are beginning in Gabon, Germany, Kenya and Switzerland to determine safety, dosing and efficacy.

“As we accelerate in a matter of weeks a process that typically takes years, we are ensuring that safety remains the top priority, with production speed and capacity a close second,“ says Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO Assistant Director-General of Health Systems and Innovation.

As next steps, the WHO Director-General will be working with groups to advance vaccines’ trials and deployment in the most expeditious manner possible.

 

Meeting participants

Meeting participants included high-ranking officials from the ministries for health and of foreign affairs from Canada, China, the European Union, France, Germany, Guinea, Italy, Japan, Liberia, Mali, Nigeria, Norway, the Russian Federation, Sierra Leone, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America

There were representatives from SAGE, the African Development Bank, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries, the European Investment Bank, the European Medicines Agency, the GAVI Alliance, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders, the Paul Erlich Institute, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Wellcome Trust, and the World Bank; and executives from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), Johnson & Johnson, Merck Vaccines, and New Link Genetics.

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Media contacts: Fadéla Chaib, Communications Officer, Telephone: + 41 22 791 3228, Mobile: + 41 79 475 55 56, Email: chaibf@who.int / Tarik Jasarevic, Communications Officer, Telephone: +41 22 791 50 99, Mobile: +41 79 367 62 14, Email: jasarevict@who.int

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#Mali confirms its first #case of #Ebola (@WHO, October 24 2014)

[Source: World Health Organization, full page: (LINK).]

Mali confirms its first case of Ebola [      ]

Ebola situation assessment - 24 October 2014

Mali’s Ministry of Health has confirmed the country’s first case of Ebola virus disease. The Ministry received positive laboratory results, from PCR testing, on Thursday and informed WHO immediately. In line with standard procedures, samples are being sent to a WHO-approved laboratory for further testing and diagnostic work.

 

Details about the case

In telephone conversation on Thursday night, health officials gave WHO the following details about the case, which is currently undergoing intense investigation.

The patient is a two-year-old girl, who recently arrived from Guinea accompanied by her grandmother. The child’s first contact with the country’s health services occurred on 20 October, when she was examined by a health care worker at Quartier Plateau in Kayes, a city in western Mali on the Senegal River.

Kayes has a population of around 128 000 people. It is located about 600 kilometres from the capital city of Bamako and lies near the border between Mali and Senegal.

The health-care worker referred the grandmother and child to the Fousseyni Daou Hospital, in the same city, where she was admitted to the paediatric ward on the following day, on 21 October. Symptoms on admission included a fever of 39°C, cough, bleeding from the nose, and blood in the stools.

Test results were negative for malaria, but positive for typhoid fever. The child received paracetamol, but did not improve. Further testing at the country’s SEREFO laboratory confirmed Ebola virus as the causative agent on 23 October.

Initial investigation of this case – the first confirmed in Mali – has revealed the extensive travel history of the child and her grandmother. The grandmother travelled from her home in Mali to attend a funeral in the town of Kissidougou, in southern Guinea.

WHO is seeking confirmation of media reports that the funeral was for the child’s mother, who is said to have shown Ebola-like symptoms before her death. These and other facts will be communicated as they are confirmed.

 

Additional facts communicated to WHO

On 19 October, the grandmother left Guinea to return to Mali, taking the child with her. The case history revealed that bleeding from the nose began while both were still in Guinea, meaning that the child was symptomatic during their travels through Mali.

Travel was by public transport through Keweni, Kankan, Sigouri, and Kouremale to Bamako. The two stayed in Bamako for two hours before travelling on to Kayes. Multiple opportunities for exposure occurred when the child was visibly symptomatic.

 

Prompt emergency response

WHO is treating the situation in Mali as an emergency. The child’s symptomatic state during the bus journey is especially concerning, as it presented multiple opportunities for exposures – including high-risk exposures - involving many people.

Continued high-level vigilance is essential, as the government is fully aware.

The child is being treated in isolation and staff have received training in appropriate procedures for safe management. The initial investigation identified 43 close and unprotected contacts, including 10 health-care workers, who are also being monitored in isolation.

The authorities in Mali have acted swiftly, also in communicating their immediate needs to WHO. These needs include training in infection prevention and control, adequate supplies of personal protective equipment, and assistance with contact tracing and overall investigation of the event.

Fortunately, key staff from WHO and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were already in Mali assisting with the country’s preparedness measures, should an imported case occur.

The WHO team already on the ground includes an infection control expert and a logistician. These and other staff are now being repurposed to assist in a surge response to the outbreak. WHO is urgently deploying a rapid response team comprising experts in clinical management, epidemiology, contact tracing, logistics and social mobilization.

WHO and the Ministry of Health see a need to accelerate the completion of an isolation facility in Bamako, and WHO has offered its support. In addition, the public needs to be informed of the situation as it evolves, including facts about the emergency actions already under way.

Outbreaks in other parts of West Africa have demonstrated how fear and anxiety, fuelled by misinformation and disinformation, if left unchecked, can be a major barrier to even the best-orchestrated containment efforts.

Both Senegal and Nigeria, two countries now declared free of Ebola virus transmission, used effective community information and education initiatives, often conducted as house-to-house campaigns, as an integral component of the outbreak response.

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#Epidemiological #update: #outbreak of #Ebola virus disease in West #Africa (@ECDC_EU, October 24 2014, edited)

[Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), full page: (LINK).]

Epidemiological update: outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa [      ]

24 Oct 2014

 

Situation in West Africa

Since December 2013 and as of 19 October 2014, WHO has reported 9 936 cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa including 4 877 deaths (Figure 1).

The additional cases from the USA and the new case in Mali reported on 23 October have not been acknowledged by WHO and are not included in the overall figures [13].

The distribution of cases is as follows:

  • Countries having reported cases in the previous 42 days (affected countries according to WHO)
    • Guinea: 1 540 cases and 904 deaths as of 19 October 2014;
    • Liberia: 4 665 cases and 2 705 deaths as of 18 October 2014;
    • Sierra Leone: 3 706 cases and 1 259 deaths as of 19 October 2014;
    • Mali: one imported confirmed case from Guinea was reported in Kayes, Mali on 23 October;
    • United States: four cases including one death. The last confirmed case occurred in New York on 23 October 2014;
    • Spain: one case, no deaths. The case is the result of secondary transmission in Spain to a nurse who cared for an EVD patient who had been evacuated from Liberia isolated on 6 October 2014;
  • Countries having reported cases more than 42 days ago (previously affected countries according to WHO):
    • Nigeria: 20 cases and 8 deaths. Nigeria was declared Ebola free on 19 October 2014;
    • Senegal: 1 confirmed imported case, no deaths. Senegal was declared Ebola free on 17 October 2014.

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Figure 1. Distribution of cases of EVD by week of reporting in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria and Senegal, weeks 48/2013 to 43/2014*

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* The bar for week 43/2014 does not represent a complete week. The solid green line represents the trend based on a five week moving average plotted on the fifth week of the moving average window. The figure includes one imported case in Senegal.

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The WHO Ebola response team showed that the current EVD cases present a similar course of infection, signs and symptoms when compared to previous outbreaks of EVD [10].

The incubation period was estimated to be 11.4 days with serial interval of 15.3 days.

The case-fatality ratio estimated among 4 010 cases with known clinical outcome in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone was 70.8% (95% CI: 68.6–72.8%) with no noticeable difference between the countries.

 

Situation in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia

According to WHO EVD transmission remains persistent and widespread in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Cases of EVD transmission remain lowest in Guinea, but case numbers are still very high in absolute terms.

Transmission remains intense in the capital cities of the three most affected countries. Case numbers continue to be under-reported, especially from the Liberian capital Monrovia.

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Figure 2. Distribution of cases of EVD by week of reporting in the three countries with widespread and intense transmission as of week 43/2014*

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* The bar for week 43/2014 does not represent a complete calendar week.

Source: Data are based on official information reported by ministries of health up to the end of 19 October for Guinea and Sierra Leone and 18 October for Liberia [14].

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Figure 3. Distribution of cases of EVD by week of reporting in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia (as of week 41/2014)

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Source: Data from ministry of health reports (probable and confirmed cases).

 

Situation among healthcare workers in West Africa

As of 19 October 2014, WHO reported 442 healthcare workers infected with EVD of whom 244 died [15]. Table 1 details the distribution of cases and deaths among healthcare workers in the five affected countries

 

Table 1. Number of Ebola cases and deaths in healthcare workers in West Africa

[Country  - Healthcare worker cases (% of reported cases)  - Healthcare worker deaths (% of reported deaths) ]

  • Guinea  - 78 (5.1) - 41 (4.5)
  • Liberia - 222 (4.8)  - 103 (3.8)
  • Sierra Leone - 129 (3.5)  - 95 (7.5)
  • Nigeria - 11 (55.0)  - 5 (62.5)
  • Spain - 1 (100.0) – 0
  • United States of America - 2 (66.0) – 0
  • Total  - 443 (4.6)  - 244 (5.0)

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Source: data are based on official information reported by Ministries of Health [15]

 

Situation outside West Africa

USA

One new case has been reported on 23 October. The case is a medical doctor who volunteered in Guinea and recently returned to the United States [11].

On 20 October, Texas Health Department confirmed that 43 people in Texas who had contact with the state's first Ebola patient have been cleared from twice-daily monitoring after reaching the 21-day mark [16].

On 22 October, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that all passengers arriving in the United States whose travel originates in Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea will be required to fly into one of the five airports that have the enhanced screening and additional resources in place. They will be actively monitored by public health authorities for 21 days. Travellers will receive a kit on arrival and must report every day to state or local public health. The kit contains information and a thermometer. They must take their temperature daily and advise whether they have any symptoms of illness. They must also disclose any intended travel. If individuals fail to report, "public health officials will take immediate steps to locate the individual to ensure that active monitoring continues on a daily basis" [17].

 

Spain

No new cases have been reported since 6 October in Spain when the health worker tested positive. On 21 October 2014, she was declared free of EVD. Eighty-three contacts are still under active follow-up [13].

 

Mali

The Ministry of Health in Mali has reported that a two-year-old girl who recently arrived from Guinea has tested positive for Ebola. This is the first confirmed case of Ebola virus infection in Mali [12].

 

Medical evacuations from EVD-affected countries

Seventeen individuals have been evacuated or repatriated from the EVD-affected countries (Table 2, Figure 4). As of 24 October, there have been nine medical evacuations of confirmed EVD cases to Europe (three to Germany, two to Spain, one to the UK, one to France, one to Norway and one to Switzerland) and two exposed persons have been repatriated to the Netherlands.

 

Table 2. Medical evacuation and repatriation from EVD-affected countries, as of 24 October 2014

[Date of evacuation - Evacuated from - Evacuated to – Profession – Status – Confirmed – Citizenship]

  1. 02 August 2014  - Liberia  - Atlanta (USA)  - Healthcare worker  - Discharged  - Yes  - USA
  2. 05 August 2014  - Liberia  - Atlanta (USA)  - Healthcare worker  - Discharged  - Yes  - USA
  3. 06 August 2014  - Liberia  - Madrid (Spain)  - Healthcare worker  - Death  - Yes  - Spain 
  4. 24 August 2014   - Sierra Leone  - London (United Kingdom)  - Healthcare worker  - Discharged  - Yes – UK
  5. 27 August 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Hamburg (Germany)  - Epidemiologist  - Recovered  - Yes  - Senegal
  6. 04 September 2014 - Monrovia, Liberia  - Omaha (USA)  - Physician (obstetrician)  - Stable  - Yes  - USA
  7. 09 September 2014  - Kenema, Sierra Leone  - Atlanta (USA)  - Physician  - Stable  - Yes  - USA
  8. 14 September 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Leiden (the Netherlands)  - Healthcare worker  - Discharged  - No  - the Netherlands
  9. 14 September 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Leiden (the Netherlands)  - Healthcare worker  - Discharged  - No  - the Netherlands
  10. 19 September 2014  - Liberia  - Paris (France)  - Healthcare worker  - Discharged  - Yes  - France 
  11. 22 September 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Madrid (Spain)  - Healthcare worker  - Death  - Yes  - Spain
  12. 22 September 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Lausanne (Switzerland)  - Healthcare worker  - Admitted – Unknown  - Non-Swiss
  13. 28 September 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Maryland (USA)  - Healthcare worker  - Admitted – Unknown  - USA
  14. 02 October 2014  - Sierra Leone  - Frankfurt (Germany)  - Healthcare worker  - Stable  - Yes  - Uganda
  15. 02 October 2014 – Liberia  - Omaha (USA)  - Cameraman  - Stable  - Yes  - USA
  16. 06 October 2014 - Sierra Leone  - Oslo (Norway)  - Healthcare worker  - Unknown  - Yes  - Norway 
  17. 08 October 2014 – Liberia  - Leipzig (Germany)  - Laboratory worker  - Death  - Yes  - Sudan

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Figure 4. Medical evacuations and repatriations from EVD-affected countries, as of 24 October 2014

_____

 

Chronology of events – key dates

  • 23 October 2014:
    • the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a new case reported on 23 October in New York City. The case is medical aid worker who volunteered in Guinea and recently returned to the United States [11]. In addition, the Ministry of Health in Mali has reported that a two-year-old girl who recently arrived from Guinea has tested positive for Ebola. This is the first confirmed case of Ebola virus infection in Mali [12].
  • 19 October 2014:
    • Nigeria was declared Ebola free
  • 17 October 2014:
    • Senegal was declared Ebola free.
  • 14 October 2014:
    • In the USA, a second healthcare worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who also cared for the imported EVD patient tested positive for Ebola.
  • 10 October 2014:
    • In the USA, a healthcare worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who cared for the first imported EVD patient tested positive for Ebola.
  • 6 October 2014:
    • The Spanish authorities reported a confirmed case of EVD in a healthcare worker who cared for the second of two EVD patients that were evacuated to Spain.
  • 3 October 2014:
    • In Senegal, all contacts of the imported EVD case had completed the 21-day follow-up period without developing disease. No local transmission of EVD has been reported in Senegal. The imported case tested negative on 5 September and WHO declared Senegal free of Ebola on 17 October 2014 (two incubation periods after the last isolated case tested negative).
  • 30 September 2014:
    • The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced the first imported case of EVD in US linked to the current outbreak in West Africa.
  • 23 September 2014:
    • A study published by the WHO Ebola response team forecasted more than 20 000 cases (5740 in Guinea, 9890 in Liberia, and 5000 in Sierra Leone) by the beginning of November 2014 [10]. The same study estimated the doubling time of the epidemic at 15.7 days in Guinea, 23.6 days in Liberia, and 30.2 days in Sierra Leone.
  • 18 September 2014:
    • The United Nations Security Council recognised the EVD outbreak as a 'threat to international peace and security' and unanimously adopted a resolution on the establishment of an UN-wide initiative which focuses assets of all relevant UN agencies to tackle the crisis [9].
  • 29 August 2014:
    • The Ministry of Health in Senegal reported a confirmed imported case of EVD in a 21-year-old male native of Guinea.
  • 8 August 2014:
    • WHO declared the Ebola outbreak in West Africa a Public Health Event of International Concern (PHEIC) [7]. On 23 October, WHO re-confirmed that the outbreak continued to constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.[8]
  • End of July 2014:
    • A symptomatic case travelled by air to Lagos, Nigeria, where he infected a number of healthcare workers and airport contacts before his condition was recognised to be EVD.
  • May 2014:
    • Sierra Leone and Liberia reported the first cases [5,6]. The disease is assumed to have spread from Guinea through the movement of infected people over land borders.
  • 22 March 2014:
    • The Ministry of Health in Guinea notified WHO about a rapidly evolving outbreak of Ebola viral disease (EVD) [1]. The first cases occurred in December 2013. The outbreak is caused by a clade of Zaïre ebolavirus that is related but distinct from the viruses that have been isolated from previous outbreaks in central Africa, and clearly distinct from the Taï Forest ebolavirus that was isolated in Côte d’Ivoire 1994–1995 [2-4] . The first cases were reported from south-eastern Guinea and the capital Conakry.

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#Dallas #Nurse With #Ebola Cleared of Virus and Will Be Released (@BloombergNews, October 24 2014)

[Source: Bloomberg, full page: (LINK).]

Dallas Nurse With Ebola Cleared of Virus and Will Be Released [   !   ]

Nina Pham, the Dallas nurse who was infected with Ebola while caring for a patient in the city, will be released from a government hospital after clearing the virus from her body.

(…)

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#NewYork City Reports Positive Test for #Ebola in #Volunteer International Aid Worker (@CDCgov, October 24 2014)

[Source: US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), full page: (LINK).]

New York City Reports Positive Test for Ebola in Volunteer International Aid Worker [      ]

A hospitalized medical aid worker who volunteered in Guinea, one of the three West African nations experiencing an Ebola epidemic, and since returned to the United States has tested positive for Ebola according to the New York City Health Department laboratory, which is part of the Laboratory Response Network overseen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The patient has been notified of the test results and remains in isolation. The patient is currently at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. Bellevue Hospital is one of eight New York State hospitals that Governor Cuomo has designated to treat Ebola patients. A specially trained CDC team determined earlier this week that the hospital has been trained in proper protocols and is well prepared to treat Ebola patients.

Confirmation testing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's laboratory will be done.

The healthcare worker had returned through JFK Airport on Oct. 17 and participated in the enhanced screening for all returning travelers from these countries.

He went through multiple layers of screening and did not have a fever or other symptoms of illness.

The patient reported a fever to local health officials for the first time today.

The patient was transported by a specially trained HAZ TAC unit wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to Bellevue. The New York City Health Department has interviewed the patient regarding close contacts and activities.

CDC is in close communications with the New York City Health Department and Bellevue Hospital, and is providing technical assistance and resources.

Three members of CDC's Ebola Response Team will arrive in New York City tonight. This team is deployed when an Ebola case is identified in the United States, or when health officials have a very strong suspicion that a patient has Ebola pending lab results.

In addition, CDC already had a team of Ebola experts in New York City who can offer immediate additional support. The CDC experts were in New York City this week assessing hospital readiness to receive Ebola patients, including Bellevue hospital. CDC's Ebola hospital assessment teams are designed to make sure that hospitals that have volunteered to take Ebola patients are Ebola ready.

These teams assess a facility's infection control readiness and to determine if there are gaps in infection control readiness. They support a facility in developing a comprehensive infection control plan. The principle is to be ready for the patient coming in the front door and everything that happens through the patient's stay in the hospital. CDC's team is a multidisciplinary team of experts. It includes infection control practice specialists, personal protective equipment specialists, worker safety experts, clinical care and diagnostics experts, and laboratory processes experts. New York City and New York State have designated Bellevue as an Ebola treatment hospital. The CDC team, which had completed its assessment of Bellevue, found the facility to be well prepared to care for a patient with Ebola.

Ebola is spread through direct contact with bodily fluids of a sick person or exposure to objects such as needles that have been contaminated. The illness has an average 8-10 day incubation period (although it could be from 2 to 21 days). CDC recommends monitoring exposed people for symptoms a complete 21 days.

Confirmatory CDC laboratory tests will be shared when these tests are done, following appropriate patient notification.

 

Post-arrival monitoring for travelers

Yesterday CDC named New York as one of six states who will begin active post-arrival monitoring of travelers whose travel originates in Liberia, Sierra Leone, or Guinea and arrive at one of the five airports in the United States doing enhanced screening. Active post-arrival monitoring means that travelers without febrile illness or symptoms consistent with Ebola will be followed up daily by state and local health departments for 21 days from the date of their departure from West Africa.

Six states (New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey, and Georgia), where approximately 70% of incoming travelers are headed, have already taken steps to plan and implement active post-arrival monitoring which will begin on Monday, October 27. Remaining states will begin their programs in coming days.

Specifically, state and local authorities will require travelers to report the following information daily: their temperature and the presence or absence of other Ebola symptoms such as headache, joint and muscle aches, weakness, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach pain, lack of appetite, or abnormal bleeding; and their intent to travel in-state or out-of-state. In the event a traveler does not report in, state or local public health officials will take immediate steps to locate the individual to ensure that active monitoring continues on a daily basis.

CDC is providing assistance with active post-arrival monitoring to state and local health departments, including information on travelers arriving in their states, and upon request, technical support, consultation and funding.

For more information on ebola, visit http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola.

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Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N1, #China (People's Rep. of) (OIE World Animal Health Information System, October 24 2014)

[Source: OIE, full page: (LINK).]

Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1, China (People's Rep. of) [      ][      ]

Information received on 24/10/2014 from Dr Zhang Zhongqui, Director General , China Animal Disease Control Centre, Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China (People's Rep. of)

  • Summary
    • Report type Immediate notification
    • Date of start of the event 12/09/2014
    • Date of pre-confirmation of the event 15/09/2014
    • Report date 24/10/2014
    • Date submitted to OIE 24/10/2014
    • Reason for notification Reoccurrence of a listed disease
    • Date of previous occurrence 01/05/2014
    • Manifestation of disease Clinical disease
    • Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
    • Serotype H5N1
    • Nature of diagnosis Clinical, Laboratory (basic), Laboratory (advanced)
    • This event pertains to the whole country
  • New outbreaks (16)
    • (…)
    • Summary of outbreaks
      • Total outbreaks: 16
        • Total animals affected: Species – Susceptible – Cases – Deaths – Destroyed – Slaughtered
          • Birds – 18 – 0 – 0 – 0
        • Outbreak statistics: Species - Apparent morbidity rate - Apparent mortality rate - Apparent case fatality rate - Proportion susceptible animals lost*
          • Birds – ** – ** - 0.00% – **
          • *Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter
          • **Not calculated because of missing information
  • Epidemiology
    • Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
      • Unknown or inconclusive
  • Control measures
    • Measures applied
      • Quarantine
      • Movement control inside the country
      • Screening
      • Zoning
      • Disinfection of infected premises/establishment(s)
      • Dipping / Spraying
      • No vaccination
      • No treatment of affected animals
    • Measures to be applied
      • No other measures
  • Diagnostic test results
    • Laboratory name and type: Species – Test - Test date – Result
      • Harbin veterinary research institute, Chinese academy of agricultural sciences (OIE’s Reference Laboratory) – Birds - reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) - 15/09/2014 – Positive
      • Harbin veterinary research institute, Chinese academy of agricultural sciences (OIE’s Reference Laboratory) – Birds  - virus isolation - 15/09/2014 – Positive
  • Future Reporting
    • The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

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Highly pathogenic #avian #influenza #H5N8, #China (People's Rep. of) (OIE, October 24 2014)

[Source: OIE, full page: (LINK). Edited.]

Highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8, China (People's Rep. of) [      ][      ]

Information received on 24/10/2014 from Dr Zhang Zhongqui, Director General , China Animal Disease Control Centre, Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, China (People's Rep. of)

  • Summary
    • Report type Immediate notification
    • Date of start of the event 12/09/2014
    • Date of pre-confirmation of the event 15/09/2014
    • Report date 24/10/2014
    • Date submitted to OIE 24/10/2014
    • Reason for notification New strain of a listed disease
    • Manifestation of disease Sub-clinical infection
    • Causal agent Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus
    • Serotype H5N8
    • Nature of diagnosis Laboratory (basic), Laboratory (advanced)
    • This event pertains to the whole country
  • New outbreaks
    • Summary of outbreaks
      • Total outbreaks: 2
        • Outbreak Location  - LIAONING ( Liuhe slaughterhouse, Dawa, Panjin Wetland of Liao river, Xinglong district, Panjin )
          • Total animals affected:  Species  -  Susceptible -  Cases -  Deaths -  Destroyed -  Slaughtered
            • Birds  -  2  -  0 -  0 – 0
          • Outbreak statistics:  Species -  Apparent morbidity rate -  Apparent mortality rate -  Apparent case fatality rate -  Proportion susceptible animals lost*
            • Birds -  ** -  ** -  0.00% -  **
            • * Removed from the susceptible population through death, destruction and/or slaughter;
            • ** Not calculated because of missing information;
  • Epidemiology
    • Source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection
      • Unknown or inconclusive
  • Control measures
    • Measures applied
      • No vaccination
      • No treatment of affected animals
    • Measures to be applied
      • No other measures
  • Diagnostic test results
    • Laboratory name and type -  Harbin veterinary research institute, Chinese academy of agricultural sciences ( OIE’s Reference Laboratory )
      • Tests and results:  Species -  Test -  Test date -  Result
        • Birds -  reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) -  15/09/2014 -  Positive
        • Birds -  virus isolation -  15/09/2014 -  Positive
  • Future Reporting
    • The event is continuing. Weekly follow-up reports will be submitted.

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#Saudi Arabia reported a new #MERS-CoV case in the last 24 hours (@SaudiMOH, October 24 2014, edited)

[Source: Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health, full page: (LINK). Edited.]

#Saudi Arabia reported a new #MERS-CoV case in the last 24 hours [      ][      ]

10/24/2014

_______

New Cases:

  1. man, 45 years old, Saudi National, resident in Taif, currently in intensive care unit with pre-existing medical condition; history of contacts with a confirmed case in a health care setting.

Earlier confirmed cases discharged from hospital:

  1. man, 82 years old, Saudi national, resident in Al Karj, with pre-existing medical condition.

Deaths in previously announced cases:

  • No reports

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الجمعه-30-1.jpg

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الجمعه-30-3.jpg

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#Saudi Arabia reported a new #MERS-CoV case on Oct. 23 2014 (@SaudiMOH, October 24 2014, edited)

[Source: Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health, full page: (LINK). Edited.]

#Saudi Arabia reported a new #MERS-CoV case on Oct. 23 2014 [      ][      ]

10/23/2014

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New Cases:

  1. woman, 73 years old, Saudi National, resident in Riyadh, currently hospitalized with pre-existing medical condition.

Earlier reported cases discharged from hospital:

  • No reports

Deaths in previously announced cases:

  • No reports

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الخميسسس ‫(1)‬.jpg

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الخميسسس ‫(35521سسس025)‬ ‫‬.jpg

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